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J&J Has Settled Its First Talc Lawsuit From Going To Trial

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17 November, 2023

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Johnson & Johnson said on Thursday that the company was able to settle two lawsuits. These lawsuits in question claimed that its talcum products led to cancer. These cases were some of the firsts of their nature to end up in trial. This is a considerable move since one of US’s federal courts rejected the company’s earlier plan. The executives had showed willingness to move the talc legal liabilities into a bankruptcy court.

J&J’s settlements apparently resolved a couple of lawsuits. Two men filed these lawsuits. Mr. Rosalino Reyes and Mr. Marlin Eagles claimed through the lawsuit that they developed diseases because of the talc. Mesothelioma because of asbestos in the J&J talcum powder was apparently the main cause.

These settlements made up a part of the broader deal that settles most of the talc related cases. The law firm that represents these victims is “Kazan, McClain, Satterley & Greenwood”. Representatives of the company have talked about the settlement.

Reyes’ family members have been continuing his lawsuit after 2020, when he died.

J&J as a company faces over 50,000 lawsuits, all arising out of talc allegation. Most of these lawsuits are by women who claim to have developed ovarian cancer.

The company has however denied these claims. Representatives said that the talc products from the company were safe, with not asbestos content.

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Debkanya is a lawyer turned writer. With an experience of 3 years, she is your go-to source for all things law. She has a soft corner for the US and international section. When the weekend arrives, you'll find her reading up on politics, Austen, or travel blogs over a cup of coffee.

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